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 The Thing About Sex Is … It Gets Better! 

Reported by MTV Act.

kylevirginBy Amy Kramer of The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy

The first time usually isn’t so great. It can be awkward or embarrassing or stressful, and for most people it’s kind of anticlimactic. So, contrary to what you see in the movies and hear from your more experienced friends, if your first time isn’t the best thing ever, you’re not alone. And certainly you saw a lot of this awkwardness on tonight’s “Virgin Territory.”

Among 18-24 year olds, less than half (46%) say their first time was “a mostly good experience.”   And the younger they were the first time they had sex, the more likely they are to say it wasn’t great. For those who were 17 or younger their first time, just 40% say it was “mostly good.” For those 18 and older the first time, 58% said so. (The average age for first sex in the U.S. is 17).

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And even those who had good feelings about it at the time, when they look back on it now, they feel differently: 55% say they were HAPPY at the time they first had sex, but looking back on it, only 31% say that’s the case. 47% say they felt LOVED their first time, but in retrospect, only 25% say that’s true. 28% say they were RELIEVED, but only 14% feel that way about it now.

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When asked if they would change something about their first time if it were possible to go back and re-do it, half (49%) said they would. What would they change? Lots of things, from doing it with someone they loved/someone who loved them, to using a condom, to allowing themselves to enjoy it more, to being sober, to just waiting a bit longer.

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A little more than one-third (38%) say their first time was “not as good as I was expecting” and another 38% say it was “about what I was expecting.” Only 19% say it was “better than I expected it would be.”

Remember Lisa from the first episode of “Virgin Territory“– she was married and in love her first time, but the experience itself was kind of underwhelming. Or Kyle, who finally did it in the most recent episode – he was psyched but you can kind of tell it didn’t knock his socks off.

Still, even if the first time isn’t like lighting and rainbows and fireworks, it does get better. The more comfortable you are with your own body, the more you know what you like and how to communicate that to your partner, the more experienced you are in general, the better it will be.

 

 The Thing About Sex Is…It Gets Better! 

Reported by MTV Act.

kylevirginBy Amy Kramer of The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy

The first time usually isn’t so great. It can be awkward or embarrassing or stressful, and for most people it’s kind of anticlimactic. So, contrary to what you see in the movies and hear from your more experienced friends, if your first time isn’t the best thing ever, you’re not alone. And certainly you saw a lot of this awkwardness on tonight’s “Virgin Territory.”

Among 18-24 year olds, less than half (46%) say their first time was “a mostly good experience.”   And the younger they were the first time they had sex, the more likely they are to say it wasn’t great. For those who were 17 or younger their first time, just 40% say it was “mostly good.” For those 18 and older the first time, 58% said so. (The average age for first sex in the U.S. is 17).

virgingoodexperiences

And even those who had good feelings about it at the time, when they look back on it now, they feel differently: 55% say they were HAPPY at the time they first had sex, but looking back on it, only 31% say that’s the case. 47% say they felt LOVED their first time, but in retrospect, only 25% say that’s true. 28% say they were RELIEVED, but only 14% feel that way about it now.

VirginTerritory-Wish

When asked if they would change something about their first time if it were possible to go back and re-do it, half (49%) said they would. What would they change? Lots of things, from doing it with someone they loved/someone who loved them, to using a condom, to allowing themselves to enjoy it more, to being sober, to just waiting a bit longer.

virginbetterthanexpected

A little more than one-third (38%) say their first time was “not as good as I was expecting” and another 38% say it was “about what I was expecting.” Only 19% say it was “better than I expected it would be.”

Remember Lisa from the first episode of “Virgin Territory“– she was married and in love her first time, but the experience itself was kind of underwhelming. Or Kyle, who finally did it in the most recent episode – he was psyched but you can kind of tell it didn’t knock his socks off.

Still, even if the first time isn’t like lighting and rainbows and fireworks, it does get better. The more comfortable you are with your own body, the more you know what you like and how to communicate that to your partner, the more experienced you are in general, the better it will be.

 

 Maybe We Should Root For The ‘Fifty Shades Of Grey’ Movie 

Reported by MTV Act.

Copies of the book "Fifty Shades of Grey

We still have a few months until the Fifty Shades of Grey movie hits theaters worldwide, but that gives us plenty of time to answer one question: Should we all be rooting for the film to be a hit?

On the surface, it might seem like a simple answer: Why not? After all, it’s a female-directed film (Sam Taylor-Johnson), and it’s based on a bestselling book by a female author (E. L. James). Hell, the screenplay is even written by a woman (Kelly Marcel). In the male-dominated film industry, that’s a major coup.

And unless you’ve already forgotten: Queen Bey herself allowed the marketing team to use a new version of “Crazy in Love” for the official trailer.

The problem with Fifty Shades of Grey is, of course, the grey area. Like most pop culture phenomena, it’s not easy to separate the book or movie into black-and-white. Sure, it’s easy to say we should celebrate a movie helmed by women, but at what cost?

For most, what it comes down to is one question: Is it possible to root for a film’s success while ignoring the source material?

People have been talking about Fifty Shades of Grey since the first book was published back in 2011. Since then, numerous articles have been written criticizing the book and its author, mostly concerning the protagonists’ BDSM relationship.

Some studies suggest that the relationship is far from healthy, even going as far as to claim that Ana’s behavior begins to mirror that of women in abusive relationships. Still other articles are quick to point out that the books spurred a sexual reawakening for some women — that reading the trilogy was actually beneficial for readers’ relationships.

What do you think, readers? Is it worth rooting for the film to be a success? Or should the Fifty Shades of Grey franchise fizzle out here?

Photo: (Getty)

 Maybe We Should Be Rooting for the “Fifty Shades of Grey” Movie… 

Reported by MTV Act.

Copies of the book "Fifty Shades of Grey

We still have a few months until the Fifty Shades of Grey movie hits theaters worldwide, but that gives us plenty of time to answer one question: Should we all be rooting for the film to be a hit?

On the surface, it might seem like a simple answer: Why not? After all, it’s a female-directed film (Sam Taylor-Johnson), and it’s based on a bestselling book by a female author (E. L. James). Hell, the screenplay is even written by a woman (Kelly Marcel). In the male-dominated film industry, that’s a major coup.

And unless you’ve already forgotten: Queen Bey herself allowed the marketing team to use a new version of “Crazy in Love” for the official trailer.

The problem with Fifty Shades of Grey is, of course, the grey area. Like most pop culture phenomena, it’s not easy to separate the book or movie into black-and-white. Sure, it’s easy to say we should celebrate a movie helmed by women, but at what cost?

For most, what it comes down to is one question: Is it possible to root for a film’s success while ignoring the source material?

People have been talking about Fifty Shades of Grey since the first book was published back in 2011. Since then, numerous articles have been written criticizing the book and its author, mostly concerning the protagonists’ BDSM relationship.

Some studies suggest that the relationship is far from healthy, even going as far as to claim that Ana’s behavior begins to mirror that of women in abusive relationships. Still other articles are quick to point out that the books spurred a sexual reawakening for some women, that reading the trilogy was actually beneficial for readers’ relationships.

What do you think, readers? Is it worth rooting for the film to be a success? Or should the Fifty Shades of Grey franchise fizzle out here?

Photo: (Getty)

 Lena Dunham Invites Twitter to Talk About Birth Control 

Reported by MTV Act.

Celebrity Sightings In New York City - July 18, 2014

In the wake of the Supreme Court decision that for-profit companies can be don’t have to provide birth control to employee, feminist activists have taken to Twitter to spark debate about the controversial ruling. Late Tuesday night, Lena Dunham joined their ranks.

Her first tweet was personal, which was no surprise coming from a writer, director, and actor who makes a living putting herself out there.

Other women followed suit, sharing why they use birth control. Some use it to control acne, while others use it because they simply don’t want to get pregnant right now.

To end the discussion, however, Dunham tweeted what most people are (hopefully!) thinking: that women don’t need to explain why they’re using birth control.

Want to support the actress and help women at the same time? Stay tuned to hear more about her upcoming book tour and to find out why Planned Parenthood is “rocking out” with her!

 Kinda Weird, But Super Important: Talking With Your Parents About Sex 

Reported by MTV Act.

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By Amy Kramer of The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy

When we meet Luke, the newest castmate of “Virgin Territory” we see a 21 year old, good looking, all-American boy. Also a virgin? Maybe a little surprising perhaps, but to Luke, it’s been made clear by his family that sex is something you save for marriage. Girlfriends are cool and all, but it is his relationship with God that’s Luke’s #1 priority.

At one point in this episode, we see Luke talking with his dad about what it’s like for him in college, and about being tempted to go all the way, but ultimately abstaining. His dad empathizes, as he knows what it’s like to be Luke’s age. For most twenty-something’s, a similar conversation could be pretty awkward. Sure, all of our parents were our age at one point, but talking about something like sex or birth control can be weird when your parents still see you as their child. But the best way to be treated as an adult is to act like an adult, and that means making sure you know how to protect yourself if you’re going to have sex, whether it be your first time or your 100th.

Among young adults who haven’t had sex yet, about half of women and 40% of guys have thought about what kind of protection they’re going to use their first time. Having a plan in place before you have sex will make the “in the moment” decision a lot easier, and sometimes that means talking to your parents about it, so they can find you condoms or help you get on the pill. Making smart choices when it comes to contraception means thinking about your future, and it will help your parents see you as a responsible adult.

That’s not to say it’s been easy for Luke. As he says, the most difficult part of being a virgin is the whole not having sex thing. If he wasn’t religious, there would be no way he’d be a virgin. We’d like to think that if that was the case, he’d also be super responsible about birth control. For more about birth control, like the different kinds out there, how to use them and where to find them, check out Bedsider.org. And for more other resources on sexual health, visit itsyoursexlife.org.

 

 Got Thoughts About Being a Virgin? You Can Share Them Anonymously. 

Reported by MTV Act.

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Didja catch the premiere of “Virgin Territory” last night? The idea of the show is to reveal how people have different opinions, thoughts and experiences with virginity, and take away some of the stereotypes that surround being a virgin or not being a virgin.

Fifteen young people get their stories told on the show, but of course countless others have their own personal stories and thoughts on virginity and being a virgin. If you’d like to anonymously share your story or thoughts, you can do so on the free app Whisper. No pressure if you don’t want to, but if you do want to, this could be a fun and safe way to express yourself and have a dialogue with other people.

Here are just a few examples, but these are far from the full discussion of this topic.

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If you have any questions about sex, like how to keep yourself protected if and when you have it, check out It’s Your (Sex) Life. It’s Your (Sex) Life will give you the deets on protection so you know how to keep yourself safe and happy.

In the meantime, it’s now in your court to tell us your virginity stories. No stereotypes, no judgement, just realness and honesty!

 12 Things You Probably Don’t Know About Virginity 

Reported by MTV Act.

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By Amy Kramer of The National Campaign To Prevent Teen And Unplanned Pregnancy

MTV’s new show, “Virgin Territory” is about that very special time in every person’s life – their first time. And while you might think you know everything there is to know about sex, chances are there is still a lot to learn. Feel free to whip out these stats next time a friend claims to be a sexpert, when they’re actually more of a rookie.

1. By the time high school graduation rolls around, only 46% of girls and 49% of guys have had sex. Which means that in high school, more than half the people are virgins.

2. Among young adults (age 18-24) who have had sex, less than half (46%) describe their first time as a “mostly good experience.” Just 19% say it was “better than I thought it would be.”

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3. Speaking of expectations, 85% of young adults say that people have unrealistic expectations about sex because of what they see in porn.

4. Most people say they used condoms the first time they did it. Among women 18-24, 66% say so, among men 18-24, 76% do.

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5. When you ask young adults what kind of advice they’d give to a high school freshman, 86% say it’s important to know that it’s okay to be a virgin when you graduate. 85% say it’s important not to believe everything you hear about other people’s sex lives.

6. Among teenagers (age 15-19) who have had sex, more than half (55%) say they wish they had waited longer.

7. Love vs. sex? Love wins. When asked whether they would rather be in a serious romantic relationship that did NOT include sexual intercourse or be having sex but not be in a serious relationship, 78% of young adults choose the sexless relationship over the relationship-less sex.

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8. Speaking of love, only 38% of young adults say they and their first sex partner loved each other.

9. When asked what they think when they find out someone their age is a virgin, 46% of young adults say they feel respect for them. 34% say they don’t even give it a second thought.

10. 90% of young adults who are virgins say they want to wait for the right time before they have sex. Only 6% say they want to have sex as soon as possible.

11. 61% of young adults say they know everything they need to know about preventing pregnancy. However, 7 in 10 pregnancies to single women 18-29 are unplanned.

12. If you’re ready for sex but don’t want to be pregnant/get someone pregnant right now (not to mention keeping you and your partner safe from STDs), the #1 tip is to be on birth control.

Tune in to Virgin Territory Tonight At 11/10c on MTV.

For more information on safe sex, visit It’s Your Sex Life.

Photo: (MTV/Virgin Territory/Getty)

 AnnaLynne McCord Talks I Choose Campaign, Giving Women a Voice 

Reported by MTV Act.

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This world needs more female directors, so keep your eyes on AnnaLynne McCord. The actress and philanthropist just directed her first movie, a short film called “I Choose,” which contrasts consent and assault, autonomy and slavery.

The film can lead you to getting involved with her new I Choose campaign, which fights human trafficking around the world. (She refers to trafficking survivors she knows in Cambodia as her “girls” and her “heroes.”) AnnaLynne also recently wrote a tell-all for Cosmopolitan where she discussed childhood physical abuse and a sexual assault that happened to her when she was a teenager. The piece was about reclaiming your voice as well as rising above and stopping abuse. AnnaLynne talked about this and more to MTV Act, discussing topics like slut-shaming (women feeling bad for their sexual sides) and the ultimate importance of having control over your body: physically, mentally and emotionally.

ACT: You’ve been passionate about the cause of human trafficking for years and now you’ve created the I Choose Project. Can you tell us more about it and how to get involved to help fight trafficking?

ANNALYNNE: The “I Choose” film premiered online to launch the campaign. I’ve fought human trafficking for over six years now, specifically with my beautiful heroes in Cambodia. I felt like I could do more as a voice and as an activist in Hollywood. I’d been mulling over this, trying to figure out how I could lend a bigger voice, how something could come really personally from me that sheds light on who I am as an advocate as well as what I’m advocating for.

I did my tell-all with Cosmo, talking about my whole life. Something I’d always feared was that if anyone involved in anti-sex trafficking activism knew I liked sex, even though I’d suffered sexual assault in my life, they’d throw me from grace. I would no longer be able to speak on behalf of sex trafficking survivors. My girls educated me against this. They’d survived, they got through it. They could make sexy jokes. That freed me, to see these girls weren’t damaged, that they could think about having a love life with a man they fell in love with. They weren’t tainted because some other man took something from them.

With the article released, I felt like, “Okay, now I can be who I am.” Then this thought came to me of showing the parallel between a woman who chooses [to have sex] and one who doesn’t, because I’ve been both. I wanted to show that I understand these two women, the one’s love and happiness in the act, and the other’s agony and shame with what’s been done to her.

+ Watch I Choose

If people want to get involved, I’m building a house for the girls in Cambodia called the Lotus House. I created a page where I have organizations around the world that I endorse that I think are doing a wonderful job fighting trafficking. Cambodia might not resonate with everyone, and I understand that. To me, it does. If it doesn’t resonate for you but Atlanta, Georgia does, then let me show you an organization in Atlanta.

ACT: You’re also the writer, director, producer and actress for the film “I Choose.” What did you set out to show with this film and what do you want people to take away from it?

ANNALYNNE: I want them to take several things away from it. My heart is in the fight to end slavery across the board, but there’s also the message of slavery we’re all touched by. That’s the slavery of our minds. The slavery of cultural and societal belief systems. We can step back and say, “No, no, no. I choose. I choose every detail and decision in my life.” It requires breaking down the biases from other people and coming to an awareness of a voice in our minds.

Are we in fact free? That’s the metaphor challenge on this film. I think there should be more of a conversation about sex so it’s not so taboo. I feel like the more we push something down, the more it can manifest itself in different ways. What is suppressed will be expressed. There’s also sexual liberalism and female empowerment in the film. I wanted to put some rough stuff into the film — without being too PG-13 — to say that as long as you choose, it’s okay, provided that you’re safe.

ACT: What’s it like being a director? Do you think you might make more pro-social films like this?

ANNALYNNE: Directing was the most fun I’ve ever had on set. The experience was really beautiful because I think the real reason I wanted to be an actress is because I love stories. I noticed my own frustration as an actress from my lack of control as to where the story was going. I would love to direct more, absolutely.

ACT: We at MTV are very proud of you for your piece in Cosmopolitan, where you talk about child abuse, sexual assault and giving women a voice. In the piece you also say that everything you’ve been through has led you to your own revolution. What is your revolution, and what words of advice about getting help do you have for people who’ve suffered physical and/or sexual abuse?

ANNALYNNE: Thank you, MTV! You guys are awesome. I would say my revolution was coming back to myself. I came into this world, guns blazing. As a child I would get myself into trouble because I couldn’t shut my mouth; I had an opinion about everything. By age nine I was telling my mom I was never getting married because there was no way in H-E-double-hockey-sticks (because we couldn’t say “hell”) I was ever going to have to listen to a man. I had the wiring of a young feminist. And through the years of abuse, that little voice diminished and it became a very quiet whisper I barely heard anymore. My revolution is that that voice is back, full-fledged. And I’m not using it simply for my own interests. I am looking out for me, which is part of that revolution, but I’m also speaking out for anyone suffering abuse who hasn’t found that voice again or doesn’t have that voice.

Just before I got on the phone with you, I was finishing up an email to a young woman who suffered sexual abuse at the hands of two family members while growing up. None of her family believed her when she told them what happened. It’s hard enough to even say what happened to me, let alone to not be validated. I was telling her about separating the beliefs systems. There’s an amazing three-step process from one of my favorite authors, don Miguel Ruiz, where he says something very crucial to the healing of your mind. I became my worst abuser because I perpetuated it into my adulthood. He says step one is: do not believe me. Step two: do not believe you. Step three: do not believe anybody else. And you’re like, “What are you supposed to believe?” What he’s saying is that the truth will always survive your skepticism. A lie needs me to believe it for it to be true. The lie I believed was that I was not good enough. Because I believed in that lie, it became truth for me. Reading that flipped my whole world upside down.

ACT: In your Cosmo piece you also say, “Most of all, I have my message for women and girls: You have a voice.” Lately we’ve been seeing more push for women’s rights with things like the #YesAllWomen campaign. How do you think we can keep this momentum going and see real change and equality?

ANNALYNNE: I’m going on a college tour this fall to talk to our little world changers, to have this conversation face-to-face. If you want me to come speak, your school can contact my rep Amber Bobin of the ESA Speakers Agency. I want to reach as many young people as possible. These are the young people on our planet who will keep this going. They’re the ones on social media, they’re the ones connecting around the world. Investing in young people will really keep the snowball effect going here. Then we get on-board with them and it’s just a circle effect.

[Editor's Note: If you or someone you know has been sexually abused, please contact RAINN at 1-800-656-HOPE. With sexual stuff, everyone involved must consent 100% to what's going on. If you or someone you know is a minor being abused, please call 1-800-394-3366 for Child Welfare. If things are bad, please contact the police.]

Photo: (I Choose)

 Beyoncé Gives $7 Million to Help Homeless + 5 Other Things to Know Today 

Reported by MTV Act.

+ Beyoncé Gives $7 Million to Help Homeless

An Alternative View: 2014 Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival - Day 2

We all know that Beyoncé makes A LOT of money, but we don’t always know that she gives A LOT of it to charity. That’s ’cause sometimes Bey keeps her charitable endeavors quiet, but now Rev. Rudy Rasmus, who married Beyoncé and Jay-Z, is reporting that she’s given seven MILLION dollars to help homeless people in Houston. “She’s an incredible human being,” Rev. Rudy Rasmus said, pretty much stating the obvious.

+ Marriage Equality in Utah

Mormons Gather For LDS Church's Semiannual Conference

So what’s up with marriage equality in Utah? First it looked like it was happening, and then state politicians tried to stop it. There’s been fighting in court, and now the state of Utah is going to the Supreme Court to try to keep same-sex couples from marrying.

+ Microchips as Birth Control?

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Can microchips become a form of birth control? Bill Gates is backing work on a potential form of birth control that would be in the form of a microchip. A professional would have to implant it the way you need doctors to implant an IUD, but then it would stay in there and work for 16 years. And you could turn it off with a remote control. Would this be a freaky perfect form of birth control, or could people grab remote controls and wreak havoc? IDK, this still just sounds like sci-fi, man.

+ Prince William and Prince Harry Support Young Leaders

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Selfies just got the royal treatment, with Princes William and Harry posing for one. Then they took part in a Google Hangout where they talked with young leaders from all different countries. And, it turns out, both Princes give some pretty good advice. “Always believe in yourself and don’t give up on your quest,” said Prince William, and Prince Harry went on, “Don’t give up, and if it’s a lack of confidence and belief then team up – there are people out there who share your passion.”

+ #OperationGirl with John Legend

BET AWARDS '14 - Show

The activist website RYOT is hooking up with Burkle Global Initiative and singer/feminist/awesome-guy John Legend for #OperationGirl, a major fundraising event to help women and girls. Different nonprofits will be contending in this super necessary campaign, and this is going on through August 18. The nonprofits get to keep whatever they earn, and RYOT will also be dispensing extra donations.

+ A Hedgehog Has a B-day Party Because Of Course

+ Watch Tiny Birthday For A Tiny Hedgehog

And, in other news, the genius who brought us Tiny Hamsters Eating Tiny Burritos is back. This new cuteness masterpiece is a “Tiny Birthday for a Tiny Hedgehog.” There’s a miniature b-day party with a hedgehog and two hamsters eating tiny pieces of cake. And wearing birthday hats. Nuff said.

Photo: (Getty, BCC, DailyMail)

 Prince Harry Dances to Katy Perry + 6 Other Things You Need to Know About Today 

Reported by MTV Act.

+ Prince Harry Dances With Disabled Kids to Katy Perry

+ Watch Prince Harry Dance to Katy Perry

 

While on his trip to Chile, Prince Harry spent time at Fundacion Amigos de Jesus, a place that helps children with disabilities. And while he was there, he not only danced with the kids, but he danced to Katy Perry’s “Firework.” And got it on film and shared it with the world. Most. Awesome. Prince. Ever.

+ Corporations Are People But Women Aren’t?

PFLAG National Straight For Equality Awards

In response to the Supreme Court siding with Hobby Lobby over a woman’s right to birth control as part of her healthcare, “Daily Show” co-creator and activist Lizz Winstead wrote, “In 2010, the Supreme Court ruled in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission that corporations are people. Today, the court just upped the ante: it ruled that Hobby Lobby, a family-owned craft store, is not only a person but also a person with religious beliefs. While they were at it, the court also decided this newly created religious-corporate-monster-person has the constitutional right to practice medicine – specifically, obstetrics and gynecology – without a license. And the best part is that the rights of this fake religious-corporate-monster-person-doctor supersede the privacy and medical needs of that old definition of a person. You know, a human being.”

+ Beyoncé Runs the (Celebrity) World

Toronto Raptors v Brooklyn Nets - Game Six

Beyoncé  sings about how girls run the world, and you know what? Forbes agrees. Actually, Forbes agrees that this particular girl runs the entertainment world. The magazine has released its Celebrity 100 List, and it put Ms. Knowles at number one. Bow down.

+ POTUS Talks Immigration Reform

President Obama Delivers Statement On Immigration Reform In The Rose Garden

President Obama said that he’s going to take executive action on immigration reform. This happened because House Speaker John Boehner is refusing to let there be a vote on immigration reform. “If House Republicans are really concerned about me taking too many executive actions, the best solution to that is to passing bills,” POTUS said. “Pass a bill. Solve a problem. Don’t just say no on something that everybody agrees needs to be done.”

+ Gay Conversion Therapy in the Courts

Los Angeles Holds Annual Gay Pride Parade

Lady Gaga would say, “You’re born this way,” but there are still some people who believe that “therapy” can change a person’s sexual orientation. This has been discredited, and the state of California forbids gay conversion therapy being done on minors. Some therapists tried to take this to the Supreme Court, but SCOTUS turned the case down.

+ Why Don’t More Women Have IUDs?

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IUDs are one of the most effective forms of birth control out there, but not many American women use them. Time asked why this was, and then Jezebel picked up the story. “Why aren’t IUDs more popular?” Jezebel asks. “There’s no worrying about broken condoms or forgotten pills, they last for years and they’re pretty much the definition of ‘set it and forget it.’ Can reproductive health advocates finally convince American women and doctors to consider them?”

+ “Broad City” Is Feminist City

4th Annual Critics' Choice Television Awards - Arrivals

Ilana Glazer and Abbi Jacobson of “Broad City” are loud and proud feminists. Abbi said, “I would totally say I’m a feminist. I don’t find it to be negative at all.” Ilana added, “I feel like a feminist is gender equality. You know, we’re feminists… the people who work on the show [Broad City] are feminists.”

Photo: (Getty, Jezebel)

 

 Wait, Some Politicians Want to Ban IUDS?! 

Reported by MTV Act.

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There are many different types of birth control, and the IUD has one of the highest success rates out there in terms of preventing pregnancy. However, politicians in Ohio are trying to keep women from being able to have IUDs.

Republican State Rep. John Becker has sponsored a bill that would forbid insurance companies from giving women IUDs. There is no scientific reason for this, and, in fact, the reason he gives for the ban is majorly suspect. He says he’s against IUDs because IUDS are like abortion, even though IUDs prevent pregnancy and abortion ends a pregnancy. In other words, they are not the same and it’s pretty basic science to know that.

“This is just a personal view,” he said. “I’m not a medical doctor.”

There are many opponents of this bill, including Democratic Rep. John Carney, who said the bill would be “very disrespectful to the women of our state.”

99% of women use birth control sometime during their lives. Along with preventing unwanted pregnancy, birth control helps a woman’s overall health. It even helps the economy, both on a personal level (for the woman using birth control) and at a national level. In other words, if more women are able to use birth control, it would help all of us out economically.

When women don’t have access to birth control, they are more likely to have unwanted pregnancies, have health issues, and live in poverty. If women don’t have access to forms of birth control, especially very reliable ones like the IUD, they are more likely to go through all these things.

Photo: (Planned Parenthood tumblr)