What Works/What Doesn’t

Preventing Pregnancy

How to Get it

Abstinence

Easy. Do nothing at all.

Male Condom

At drugstores and supermarkets; costs 35 ¢ to $2 each. They are often free at family planning or STD clinics. Find a clinic at hivtest.org or plannedparenthood.org.

The Pill

Through a prescription from a health care provider; the cost is about $15 to $50 a month depending on the pill brand, plus the cost of the office visit. Whether you need parental consent for a prescription depends on your state, find more here. http://www.guttmacher.org/statecenter/spibs/spib_MACS.pdf

The Shot

Requires a visit to your health care provider every 3 months to get the shot; the cost is about $35 to $75 per shot, plus the cost of the office visit.

Diaphragm

Through a prescription from a health care provider; the cost is about $15 to $75 plus the cost of spermicide and the exam and fitting for the diaphragm.

Cervical Cap

Through a prescription from a health care provider; the cost is about $15 to $75 plus the cost of spermicide and an exam.

The Patch

Through a prescription from a health care provider; the cost runs $15 to $50 a month, plus the cost of the visit to a health care provider. Whether you need parental consent for a prescription depends on your state, find more here. http://www.guttmacher.org/statecenter/spibs/spib_MACS.pdf

The Ring (NuvaRing)

Through a prescription from a health care provider; the cost runs $15 to $50 a month, plus the cost of the visit to a health care provider. Whether you need parental consent for a prescription depends on your state, find more here. http://www.guttmacher.org/statecenter/spibs/spib_MACS.pdf

IUD

Requires a visit to a health care provider; cost is about $175 to $650 for insertion and removal costs about $100.

Implant

Requires a visit to a health care provider; the cost for insertion is usually about $400-$800 (which is less than the overall cost of 3 years of birth control pills).

Emergency Contraceptive

If you are 17 or older, you can buy emergency contraception at most drugstores or family planning clinics; costs $10 to $70. If you are 16 or younger, you can get it from your health care provider.

Fertility Awareness (Doesn’t Work Well)

Women will need good instruction–a class or health care provider–and several months of charting before they begin to rely on this method.

Spermicide (Doesn’t Work Well)

At drugstores and supermarkets. The cost is $9 to $12 for the spermicide and applicator; refills cost $4 to $8.

Withdrawal (Doesn’t Work Well)

You just do it.

Condoms, when used consistently and correctly, are the ONLY method that protects sexually active people from both STDs and pregnancy.

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